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KaZoon Kites Teacher’s Guide

SKU: W59461
A Pitsco Exclusive
$24.95 (USD)
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Description


Available now in both print and free digital download!

You don’t have to play with lightning to learn from kites! This guide shows how to construct a tetrahedron kite and use it to demonstrate many important principles: lift, area and volume, density, forming and testing a hypothesis, tetrahedral and polyhedral design, and more.

The KaZoon Kites Teacher’s Guide contains NGSS and Common Core standards addressed; teacher and student instructions for a variety of math, science, and technology activities; pretests and posttests; and resource pages.

Equipment and materials needed to complete guide activities include the Pitsco KaZoon Kites, scissors, three spring scales, tape measure or ruler, altimeter, wind gauge, stopwatch, scale, and standard classroom tools and materials. Note: This list is for all activities; individual activities don’t require all listed materials.

Details

Type: Activity Guides and Curriculum/Teacher's Guides Grades: 6-12

Safety

Resources

Learning Values

Science
  • Forces
  • Lifting bodies
  • Equilibrium
  • Newton’s laws
Technology
  • Attributes of design
  • Historical perspectives
  • Structures
Engineering
  • Problem solving
  • Materials strength
  • Technological design
Math
  • Binomial expansion
  • Congruency
  • Geometric solids
  • Measuring angles

Specifications

  • Author: Robert Stokes
  • Pages: 96
  • Binding: Paperback/spiral-bound
  • Copyright: 2020
  • Publisher: Pitsco, Inc.
  • Number of Lessons: 6

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“The KaZoon Kite isn’t your ordinary, run-of-the mill kite. No, indeed. It’s a tetrahedron. . . . I guarantee this is one of the most interesting kites you’ll ever see. . . . After seeing the unique shape and style of the kite, I was looking forward to trying it out. . . . All in all, this would be a fun family project, and if your kids enjoy hands-on activities, I can’t see going wrong with this one. Check it out.”

– Jonathan Lewis, editor, Home School Enrichment magazine