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Math Curriculum

Math Curriculum

Classroom Solutions for Math
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From alligator arms and lion lunge to turtle tuck and zebra zigzag, these fun illustrations will get students moving while they learn phonics. Available as student flash cards (3.5" x 5.5") or teacher flash cards (11" x 17"). Teacher cards are punched and bound with split rings for easy flipping. These flash cards are for the Gym Phonics and Class Phonics programs. Includes 27 cards.

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Students will have fun learning to count from 1 to 20 with these colorful cards (1 panda, 2 bears, 3 fish, and so on). Plus, there are add, subtract, multiply, divide, and other mathematical-function cards. Available as student flash cards (3.5" x 5.5") or teacher flash cards (11" x 17"). Teacher cards are punched and bound with split rings for easy flipping. Includes 33 cards.

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An A-Z deck with fun facts about colorful critters! The Animal Science Flash Cards provide the class, diet, habitat, and location of creatures such as the clown fish, jaguar, octopus, yak, and more. Available as student flash cards (3.5" x 5.5") or teacher flash cards (11" x 17"). Teacher cards are punched and bound with split rings for easy flipping. Includes 27 cards.

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OVERVIEW
In Astronomy, students learn about the solar system and their relationship to it from a mathematical perspective. They investigate the Sun-Moon-Earth system and the characteristics, sizes, and distances of planets in the solar system. They construct a small refracting telescope and learn how it functions. They explore gravity and orbits, distinguish between weight and mass, and relate the kinetic energy equation to crater impacts.

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

  • Use a planetarium model to investigate Sun-Moon-Earth movements.
  • Relate gravity to orbits and distinguish between circular and elliptical orbits.
  • Distinguish between weight and mass.
  • Use the equation F = ma to calculate force, given mass.
  • Learn the characteristics of the Sun and planets.
  • Develop scale models comparing sizes and distances in the solar system.
  • Explain the differences between reflecting and refracting optical telescopes and calculate magnification.
  • Understand the kinetic energy equation KE = 1/2 mv² and relate it to crater impacts.
  • Express solar system distances in scientific notation.

ACTIVITIES
Students complete three performance assessments: 1) Planetary Motions – use the planetarium model to explain Earth’s rotation and revolution, day-night cycles, seasons, and tides; 2) Planetary Distance – develop a scale model of solar system distances and calculate distances using both scientific notation and astronomical units; and 3) Telescopes – identify the parts of a refracting telescope, explain functions of its lenses, define focal length, and explain its relationship to magnification.


 

OVERVIEW

In this MATH Expedition, students analyze data concerning population growth and available resources for a fictional city. They create and graph linear and exponential functions from the data to determine trends.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION

How do population growth, employment growth, and resource availability affect people’s decisions in relocating to an urban setting?

 

OVERVIEW
In BioEngineering, students explore topics related to kinesiology and sports performance. They cover mathematical concepts including measuring and classifying angles, absolute values, positive and negative rational numbers, data collection, and simple algebra. Students perform flexibility tests, take digital images of the tests, and use the computer to analyze their flexibility.

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

  • Practice absolute value, number lines, and positive and negative numbers.
  • Measure, classify, and identify angles using a protractor, a goniometer, a digital camera, and imaging software.
  • Gather, graph, and interpret data on projectiles, relating angle size to distance achieved.
  • Relate angle measurement to physical therapy, physical fitness, and sports performance.

ACTIVITIES

Students complete three performance assessments: 1) Projectile Data – estimate and justify the best angle from which to release a projectile in order to achieve a maximum distance; 2) Measure Body Angles – demonstrate and explain how to measure a joint angle using both a goniometer and a protractor; and 3) Angle Analysis – explain how angles apply to the function of the flexibility tester and identify the angle of joint ROM required in order to achieve maximum reach.

 

OVERVIEW

In the Building with Patterns MATH Expedition, students examine patterns used to build and design tetrahedron and box kites. The patterns include both physical and economic models that are associated with building both styles of kites. Students build a base model and then expand the model to more complex arrangements.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION

How can functions help investors make wise decisions?

 

OVERVIEW

In the Built to Last MATH Expedition, students work as chief engineers of a high-rise construction project that is having to make adjustments to the project due to earthquake concerns.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION

What ways can math be used to predict how best to maintain safety while minimizing costs in building construction?